Student Checklist for On-Campus Employment

Do you want to work on-campus while you’re in school? Student employment can be a great way to build your professional skills and experience while also supporting your financial needs.

We want to make the student employment process as clear and easy as possible, so take a minute to explore the steps below. If you’ve still got questions, you can find more in-depth information in the Student Employment Guidelines, and you can contact us any time at stuemp@du.edu.

(Note: these steps are for both work-study and non-work-study funded student employment positions. If you are not interested in work-study funded positions, skip ahead to step 3.)

Step 1. Submit Your FAFSA!
Step 2. Accept Your Work-Study Award (If Applicable)
Step 3. Find a Job
Step 4. Apply and Interview
Step 5. Get Onboarded and Oriented
Step 6. Attend Trainings 
Step 7. Get Paid
Step 8. Wrap Things Up

Step 1. Submit Your FAFSA!

If you want to be considered for work-study positions, submit your FAFSA form as early as possible and indicate your interest! If you are eligible for work-study funding but do not receive it in your financial aid package, you may apply to be placed on a waiting list. For this or other questions about work-study and financial aid, check out the resources from Financial Aid or email workstudy@du.edu.

For incoming students applying for fall admission, the priority deadline for submission is January 15. For returning students, the priority deadline is March 15.

Step 2. Accept Your Work-Study Award (If Applicable)

If work-study was included in your financial aid package, you must accept your work-study award through PioneerWeb. To do so, log into PioneerWeb and go to your Student tab. Click on the “Accept/Decline Financial Aid” link in the Financial Aid Information box. Choose the correct year from the drop-down menu. Go to the Terms and Conditions tab, read through, and click Accept. Then go to the Accept Award Offer tab, choose Accept from the drop-down menu next to your work-study award, and submit.

Step 3. Find a Job

If you’re ready to start looking for student employment positions, log into PCO, the career event, appointment, and job/internship site for DU students and alumni. You can use this system to find and apply for both FWS and non-FWS positions. Work-study positions usually begin to be posted in June and will continue to be posted throughout the summer and the academic year. International students should work with an ISSS advisor to make sure their student employment complies with their visa requirements.

Step 4. Apply and Interview

When you apply for positions, your resumes will go through a resume review process to help you put your best foot forward. You are able to apply for positions only after the resume has been reviewed and approved, so make sure to allow at least 3 days for this step! Before uploading your materials, you can check out our resume and cover letter advice.

For many positions, the hiring manager will conduct some form of interview with top candidates before hiring someone. If you have an interview coming up, make sure to review our preparation advice to get ready!

Step 5. Get Onboarded and Oriented

Once the hiring manager makes an offer of employment and you accept it, you will need to submit paperwork including a background check, an I-9 form, and a W-4 form, to Shared Services. Make sure to submit these promptly and communicate with your supervisor about them as needed. Reach out to sharedservices@du.edu with any questions.

Student employment can be a foundational experience for your professional development, so join us on Canvas for an orientation course to make the most of it. This orientation will include more details about working with your supervisor, getting paid, and more. Orientation will be made available by the end of the winter quarter 2021.

As you get started in your student employment job, spend a little time learning about your supervisor and their communication and feedback styles. Consider using this questionnaire as a starting point.

Step 6. Attend Trainings

You’re also invited to join us throughout the academic year for brief trainings on key topics like professionalism, working remotely, and your rights and responsibilities as a student employee. Check out our Student Employee Achieve Series from Fall 2020– if your team would like an on-demand training like these, just let us know! In addition, we offer a number of career and professional development programs on PCO for student employees.

Step 7. Get Paid

Throughout your time as a DU student employee, you will need to record and submit your hours worked through PioneerTime by the end of each pay period. Students are paid every two weeks, and your supervisor will need to approve your timecards at the end of each biweekly pay period. Shared Services provides lots of guidance on using the system, but if you have any additional questions, reach out to pioneertime@du.edu.

Your supervisor will monitor your hours worked, but it’s a good idea for you to keep an eye on this, too. Partway through the academic year, check in with your supervisor about your remaining Work Study funding balance or hours worked. For more details on hours, holidays, and overtime, see the Student Employment Guidelines.

Step 8. Wrap Things Up

If you need to leave your job before its planned end, use best practices by giving your supervisor ample notice of separation so they may prepare to transition your position duties and hire a replacement. For guidance on how to handle challenging situations in your student employment, contact us at stuemp@du.edu.

The last day for students to earn wages from their work-study award for the 2020-21 academic year for Law Students is
May 20, 2021; for Undergraduate/Graduate Students, the last day is June 10, 2021.

As your student employment job wraps up, make sure to reflect on your experience and think about what’s next. Consider talking with your supervisor about the skills you built and how they might apply to future employment. You can also make an appointment with a career advisor in the Career & Professional Development team to articulate the value of your student employment for future employers.

By Elise Goss-Alexander
Elise Goss-Alexander Assistant Director, Student Employment Elise Goss-Alexander